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If your Corsa refuses to crank over on the starter motor (.i.e just a "click click") don't immediately presume it's the starter motor at fault.
I have just had the same fault on two Vauxhalls; my daughters 2003 Corsa C 1.2 and my wife's 2007 Tigra B (TwinTop) 1.4. These cars are identical in build and engine layout (same engine just a bigger bore.)

I have replaced the starter motor on both cars with new Bosch units, and since then BOTH cars have had the starting problem reoccurring.

Firstly I had a look at the wifes Tigra.
After confirming that the starter motor was not at fault, I tried adding an additional thick earth lead direct from the battery negative post direct to the engine; result was "click click" again.
In a last bid I added an additional thick main positive lead from the battery positive post direct down to the starter motor terminal; problem solved!
I then went over to my daughters place, who's car has exactly the same problem and also after fitting a new Bosch starter motor. I did exactly the same on her Corsa C 1.2, trying the negative lead test but still it wouldn't start. Again, adding the additional main positive lead from the battery positive post direct to the starter motor has cured the starting problems.

Looking at the original Vauxhall wiring, I see the problem as follows…. The main positive battery post has two BIG leads leading from it; one to supply power to the starter motor and receive power from the alternator, and the other big lead to supply power to the remainder of the vehicles electrics.
The main BIG positive lead that goes to across the plenum area and down to the engine has to perform two functions…
1). To supply power from the battery to the starter motor (max current request)
2). To carry power from the alternator to the battery (charge)
Conventionally, on a "normal" car, this big lead would run direct to the alternator first, then bridge across to the starter motor via a direct metal contact within the alternator, then on to the starter motor via another thick lead. This would effectively give a 'continuous' lead.
However, from what I can see, Vauxhall, (in their wisdom) have decided to run the big thick lead from the battery positive post, down to the alternator, with a 'splice' off it going to the starter motor. What a crap idea that is! If it was the other way round it would be too bad, but a starter motor takes that much current that eventually a splice is going to break down, as I have found on both of these cars.

The fix?
  • Position the vehicle on car ramps.
  • Disconnect the battery negative lead.
  • Using 100 amp cable, cut the cable to give a length of approximately 3½ feet.
  • Solder an 8mm 'eye' to each end.
  • Working on the underside of the vehicle, remove the M8 nut securing the main positive lead. Do NOT remove the existing cable!
  • Guiding the new cable upwards and round the back of the engine, attach the new cable eye to the stud on the starter motor (along with the existing cable), fit and tighten the M8 nut.
  • The other end of the new cable needs to be routed up the bulkhead, and over to the LH side where the battery is. Make sure that this additional lead is guided through the plastic guide and NOT near the metal bulkhead panel.
  • Attach the end of the new cable to the battery positive post terminal.
  • Reconnect the battery negative lead.
  • Start your engine!

I will add some pictures later of the cable guidance and I hope this is of help to some of you frustrated owners!

Kind regards
Will Barber
 

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Hiya, thanks for your explanation o n the starter front. Im a plasterer so not mechanically minded really. but my sister has has the same issue with her 55 plate astra. she had green flag out and they said it was the cabling that was at fault, told her that the wiring could be corroded. as such he said that green flag wouldnt attend again as it is unreliable lol. what exactly is she paying for ? anyway i digress. she said that he put a wire straight from the battery to the starter and hey presto as you did it fired up. so as you said no problem in the starter, its the cabling. you did say you were going to put pics on? i guess with the time that has passed that you wont have them anymore ha ha. would you say ramps are necessary? or would it be do-able if i was flexible?
 

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Hi there i have heard of this problem before, some time ago someone reported they had found the same thing....but it hasn't occurred lately so i thought it might have been a one off, apparently not...from Fred in Essex.
 

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If your Corsa refuses to crank over on the starter motor (.i.e just a "click click") don't immediately presume it's the starter motor at fault.
I have just had the same fault on two Vauxhalls; my daughters 2003 Corsa C 1.2 and my wife's 2007 Tigra B (TwinTop) 1.4. These cars are identical in build and engine layout (same engine just a bigger bore.)

I have replaced the starter motor on both cars with new Bosch units, and since then BOTH cars have had the starting problem reoccurring.

Firstly I had a look at the wifes Tigra.
After confirming that the starter motor was not at fault, I tried adding an additional thick earth lead direct from the battery negative post direct to the engine; result was "click click" again.
In a last bid I added an additional thick main positive lead from the battery positive post direct down to the starter motor terminal; problem solved!
I then went over to my daughters place, who's car has exactly the same problem and also after fitting a new Bosch starter motor. I did exactly the same on her Corsa C 1.2, trying the negative lead test but still it wouldn't start. Again, adding the additional main positive lead from the battery positive post direct to the starter motor has cured the starting problems.

Looking at the original Vauxhall wiring, I see the problem as follows…. The main positive battery post has two BIG leads leading from it; one to supply power to the starter motor and receive power from the alternator, and the other big lead to supply power to the remainder of the vehicles electrics.
The main BIG positive lead that goes to across the plenum area and down to the engine has to perform two functions…
1). To supply power from the battery to the starter motor (max current request)
2). To carry power from the alternator to the battery (charge)

Conventionally, on a "normal" car, this big lead would run direct to the alternator first, then bridge across to the starter motor via a direct metal contact within the alternator, then on to the starter motor via another thick lead. This would effectively give a 'continuous' lead.
However, from what I can see, Vauxhall, (in their wisdom) have decided to run the big thick lead from the battery positive post, down to the alternator, with a 'splice' off it going to the starter motor. What a crap idea that is! If it was the other way round it would be too bad, but a starter motor takes that much current that eventually a splice is going to break down, as I have found on both of these cars.

The fix?
  • Position the vehicle on car ramps.
  • Disconnect the battery negative lead.
  • Using 100 amp cable, cut the cable to give a length of approximately 3½ feet.
  • Solder an 8mm 'eye' to each end.
  • Working on the underside of the vehicle, remove the M8 nut securing the main positive lead. Do NOT remove the existing cable!
  • Guiding the new cable upwards and round the back of the engine, attach the new cable eye to the stud on the starter motor (along with the existing cable), fit and tighten the M8 nut.
  • The other end of the new cable needs to be routed up the bulkhead, and over to the LH side where the battery is. Make sure that this additional lead is guided through the plastic guide and NOT near the metal bulkhead panel.
  • Attach the end of the new cable to the battery positive post terminal.
  • Reconnect the battery negative lead.
  • Start your engine!

I will add some pictures later of the cable guidance and I hope this is of help to some of you frustrated owners!

Kind regards
Will Barber
Thanks Will, great piece of history, I'm trying this at the moment. Making a 12v extra lead from a jump lead, hoping it doesn't melt lol.
 

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2007 corsa d cdti life.
For clarity, you refer to the 'Starter' but mine is connected to the solenoid.
One 13mm nut (IN) from the 'splice' side, and the other OUT to a short shielded cable directly Into the actual starter motor.
Please reassure me that the 'spliced' connection is the correct side.
A flying lead 12v+ direct to the OUT terminal of the solenoid would just make the starter run continuously ??

Sorry Will, that didn't work for me, I'm running of guesswork. I'm thinking intermittent Power Supply issues but it could any of the problems readers have: ECU, EGR, ABS...
I can't get Fault Codes because the Port connector at the bottom dash is missing. ho-hum. I'm getting a headache lol
 

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"mikeyd06, post: 959807"
I'm not sure it would do any good unless the heat is causing the big supply wire to stretch and break the circuit at the splice as Will Barber says above.
Could be. Strange things happen.

Mine was when i put on Ramps it wouldnt start, and the wrong warning lights...
When i jacked it up off the Chassis, by accident it started and still runs fine.
Musta stretched the stupid spur wire somehow.

Yours sounds more heat related. Can get any codes off the OBD port down bottom of the center console?
I dont see more power to the Starter would make a difference unless the Starter itself is really heating up, then could be a problem
More likely one of them pesky diesel sensors. Does it overheat?
Get a cheap OBD II On Board Diagnostic plug-in, then can read the codes off your fone or pc
Fault codes always handy on a Corsa. Or better get someone to do it for you :)
 

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No the car doesn't overheat,no warning lights nothing it only happens when you drive for 45 minutes to an hour then when you go to start it it just clicks,walk away for 30 mins or so then it starts fine... and sometimes you can turn the key afew times quick (not always) and it works...I've got an OBD ll...thank you for your reply.
 

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mikeyd06. You have my sympathy with these mystery faults.
All i can say is i ran a long lead from the Battery Positive (like Will said) to the solenoid and that didnt work.
Then i put the same long lead to the actual Starter terminal and the Starter wizzed around, proving it was working.
Then i put a short lead from the Alternator to the Solenoid, in effect bypassing the splice in the wiring and that worked.
I cut up a bit of jump-start lead, about 6 inches, and made sure it had a good connection. Its been working since.
You could try doing that. I'm not sure if it will make any difference but at least that will discount it as the fault (or it will work).
What is the difference between hot and cold to the starter? And the solenoid does click? Good luck and best wishes. Baz
 
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